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How to write a CV for when you don’t know what you want next

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How to write a CV for when you don’t know what you want next

Most people just out of school or done with a previous job find themselves at a loss when thinking about the next step to take in their careers. A lot of people plan on sending out CVs to companies in the hopes of figuring out what they want to do eventually. However, sending out a CV – in fact, designing a CV when you have no idea where to go next with your career can be a challenge, and something a lot of people struggle with.

    1. The first thing you need to know is what you want in terms of your career and the job. Knowledge, therefore, is essential. Research jobs and roles; websites like Seek (www.seek.co.nz, www.seek.co.au) and TradeMe (www.trademe.co.nz) can be valuable resources, making you aware not only of the wide job categories, but also available jobs within those.
    2. Be aware of the responsibilities involved in the jobs you are interested in and catch your eye. Some might sound glamorous, but may not be suited to your skillsets. Ask yourself whether you will be able to fulfil these responsibilities in a satisfactory manner, and, more importantly, whether you will be happy doing these things.
    3. If you are still figuring things out, consider maintaining some common ground between the job you are coming from, to the one you intend to go to. A smooth transition is important, as is finding a balance between what you would like to do, and what you think you might find success in. For instance, if you were previously a writer in a science daily, but now wish to be an export sales manager in a clothing company, that might be stretching it too far; an overlap is important and should be taken into consideration.
    4. Research is vital, not only with regard to the job you want to be a part of, but also information from within the industry. Read online, meet and network with people who work within the industry, and try to glean as much information about the job as you possibly can, to gauge whether it can engage you in the long run, or if it is merely a momentary fascination.
    5. Ask people what their job is like; chances are, they would be more than happy to share both the good and the bad, meaning that you would have enough information to help you decide whether or not the job or the industry is for you.
    Confusion when embarking on something new is inevitable, and can often be very scary. But with the right steps in the right direction, people often find themselves occupying a relatively stress-free and clear position, which also reaps innumerable benefits for them, both on a professional as well as a personal level.

Confusion when embarking on something new is inevitable, and can often be very scary. But with the right steps in the right direction, people often find themselves occupying a relatively stress-free and clear position, which also reaps innumerable benefits for them, both on a professional as well as a personal level.